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The big one! Chain sharpening is the single most important aspect of using a chainsaw. There is nothing else more important if you own a chainsaw than a correctly sharpened chain. Dull chains cause faster wear on all moving parts. If the chainsaw does not cut wood with a straight, smooth, progressive feel then the chain is dull.

Does my chain need sharpening?

If you’re asking yourself this question the answer is probably yes!

Understanding how a chainsaw chain cuts and you’re half way to understanding how to correctly sharpen your chain. If you take some time to read Oregon’s maintenance manual below, this will give you a solid foundation to build on.

Click here to understand how a chain cuts from Madsens

Click here for Oregon’s chainsaw maintenance guide

Video advisory

Manual chain sharpening

 

 

Damaged chain and causes

Peened drive links

Terrible for your bar. Chain has come off bar, drive sprocket is worn or the incorrect drive sprocket has been used.

Peened drive links

Peening of tie straps

This guide bar has been forced to cut. This is usually caused by a dull chain, poor bar lubrication and / or loose chain tension.

Peening of tie straps

Damage to bottom of drive link

Worn drive sprocket or bar rails have been dressed below minimum height.

worn drive sprocket

worn rim

Blunt chain

Time to sharpen. Notice on a full, fast cutting chisel chain it doesn’t take much to dull the fine point that is the crucial part that cuts the wood. Dirty wood is very detrimental for full chisel chains. Semi chisel and chipper chains are more resistant to dulling.

Blunt chain

blunt chain image

Damaged chain when hitting metal

This is what the damaged chain will look like after hitting metal.

Damaged chain hitting metal

damaged chain hitting metal image

Video advisory

How to recover badly damaged chain

 

Click here for chain sharpening equipment

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